Error
  • The template for this display is not available. Please contact a Site administrator.

Seasonal Safety Tips

 

Seasonal Safety Tips

 Spring

 Bicycle Safety

 ·   Wear a bicycle helmet that is properly fitted. The chin strap should be snug against the underside of the chin, and the helmet should not tilt forward or to one side. For more information see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication “Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.”

 ·   Always wear neon, fluorescent, or other bright colors when riding day or night. Add reflective tape to your bicycle or even to your clothing to allow yourself to be seen by cars.  You can also purchase flashing lights that can be fitted to your bike for night time riding. 

 ·   If your children are old enough to be riding alone or with friends, discuss boundaries where they are allowed to ride.  They should avoid all roads with moderate to heavy traffic and stay on the sidewalk when possible.

 Spring Cleaning Safety Tips

 ·   Dispose of those old cans of paint and thinners and accumulated newspapers and magazines. Make sure gasoline and other hazardous chemicals are stored where children can’t get to them.

 ·   When you clean windows check them for ease of opening as you may need them as a means of exit in case of fire.

 ·   Spring Ahead:  When you change your clock for Daylight Savings Time, you should also change the batteries in your smoke detectors.  Inspect and clean dust from the covers of your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms as well.

 ·   You can also take this time to review and practice your home escape plan with your children.

 Summer

 Sun and Heat Exposure

 ·   Always apply sunscreen before going outside, and make sure to reapply periodically throughout the day according to the instructions.  A sun burn can occur even when it seems overcast or cool outside.

 ·   Avoid heat-related illnesses by drinking plenty of water and getting enough to eat. Wear a hat and light clothing that allows for evaporation (cotton is best).

 ·   When the car is hot, check the metal parts of the seat belt before fastening, especially on infant car seats. Also be sure to check leather or plastic seats for extreme heat.

·   Never leave your child unattended in the car.  Temperatures inside the vehicle can rise extremely quickly, even when it is cool as 70 degrees outside.  In 2010, 49 children died from being left inside hot cars, the highest number since record-keeping began. (Safe Kids USA)

 Bicycle Safety

 ·   Wear a bicycle helmet that is properly fitted. The chin strap should be snug against the underside of the chin, and the helmet should not tilt forward or to one side. For more information see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication “Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.”

 ·   Always wear neon, fluorescent, or other bright colors when riding day or night. Add reflective tape to your bicycle or even to your clothing to allow yourself to be seen by cars.  You can also purchase flashing lights that can be fitted to your bike for night time riding. 

 ·   If your children are old enough to be riding alone or with friends, discuss boundaries where they are allowed to ride.  They should avoid all roads with moderate to heavy traffic, and stay on the sidewalk when possible.

Water Safety

 ·   Supervise children constantly while swimming or in the bath tub.  

 ·   Install a four-foot fence around the pool with a self-latching and locking gate. Also remove chairs or ladders from the pool area to prevent children from climbing over the fence.

 ·   Empty small children’s pools and remove all toys when they are not in use. Infants can drown in just a few inches of water. Floats, balls and other toys may attract children to the pool when it is unattended.

 ·   Children who are not good swimmers should wear life jackets or other flotation devices.  By law, all children under age 13 must wear a life jacket when boating, regardless of swimming ability.  This is especially important even before entering the boat; children can easily fall off a dock or pier and into the water.

 ·   Make sure life jackets fit properly.  To test a life jacket, pull up on the shoulder area of the jacket when it is being worn.  If the jacket can be pulled up to the chin or higher, it is too big.

 Fireworks

 ·         Most fireworks are illegal in Illinois without special permits. Novelty fireworks such as sparklers, smoke bombs, snakes and party poppers are generally allowed, but this varies by city. For example, the use of sparklers is banned in Chicago and carries heavy fines. Be sure to check with your local authorities before buying any fireworks.

 ·         Even in places where fireworks and sparklers are legal, they are still extremely dangerous.  Sparklers can reach temperatures as high as 1200 degrees Fahrenheit.

 ·          Never point or throw fireworks at another person, and remember that they are not toys.  Children should never be allowed to handle fireworks.  

 ·         Have water handy when using fireworks, and avoid wearing loose clothing while using them.

 ·         Never attempt to relight or "fix" fireworks, and never carry them in your pockets.

 Other Summer Safety Tips

 ·         Keep any furniture that your children can climb on away from open windows. Children can quickly climb to window ledges or sills and fall.  Screens do not stop children from falling through the window. 

 ·         Use the 4-inch Rule:  Windows should not be opened more than 4 inches, as this is all the space children need to fall out.  Products like Super Stoppers can be purchased to prevent windows from being opened more than 4 inches.

 ·         Keep grills at least 10 feet from any structure to prevent fires. Never grill indoors, even if it is raining. 

 ·         Carefully inspect backyard playground equipment for broken parts and general wear and tear. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, 70 percent of all playground-related deaths occur on home playground equipment. Make sure equipment is anchored safely in the ground, all equipment pieces are in good working order, S-hooks are entirely closed and bolts are not protruding.

 Fall

 Back to School Safety

 ·         If your child is heading off to school for the first time, teach them their home phone number and how to call 911 in an emergency or if they are lost.  

 ·         Fall Back:  When you change your clock for Daylight Savings Time, you should also change the batteries in your smoke detectors.  Inspect and clean dust from the covers of your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms as well.

 ·         Talk to your children about safely waiting at bus stops, getting on, or getting off the bus.  Children should never stand in the street; they should always wait on the sidewalk or corner.  They should look both ways before crossing the street carefully, even if the bus has extended its stop sign and stop arm.

 Halloween

 ·         Plan costumes that are bright and reflective, and consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags if they are not.  Talk to your children about staying on the sidewalk if possible, watching for cars, and looking both ways before crossing the street.

·          Make sure that that costumes are flame-resistant and short enough to prevent tripping.

 ·         Only trick-or-treat in well known neighborhoods at homes that are well lit. 

 ·         Ask your local authorities about the hours when trick-or-treating is allowed in your community.  This time is generally set between 4 and 7 pm, but may be earlier in some areas.  Do not allow children to trick-or-treat outside the allotted hours or after it becomes dark.

 ·         Never consume unwrapped food items or open beverages that may be offered. Make sure children know that no treats are to be eaten until they are thoroughly checked by an adult at home.

 ·         Make sure small or hard candies that can cause choking are given only to those of an appropriate age.

 ·         Secure emergency identification (name, address, phone number) discreetly within Halloween attire or on a bracelet.

 ·         Because a mask can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic and hypoallergenic makeup or a decorative hat as a safe alternative.

 Winter

 Holiday Safety

 

  • Make sure candles are placed far away from flammable material and out of the reach of children.  Young children often reach up and pull objects from tables, and could accidently pull a lit candle down onto themselves.
  • When decorating Christmas trees, always use safe tree lights. Some lights are designed only for indoor or outdoor use, but not both. Tree lights should not have simply a bare bulb, as this could cause a fire.
  • Never use electric lights on a metal tree.
  • Always unplug Christmas lights before leaving home or going to sleep.
  • Any string of lights with worn or frayed cords should not be used.
  • When purchasing an artificial tree, be sure it is labeled as fire-retardant.
  • Try to keep live trees as moist as possible by giving them plenty of water daily.

 Cold Weather

 ·         Know the signs of hypothermia in infants:  bright red, cold skin and low energy.

 ·         Monitor the time children spend playing in the snow.  Remember that the wind chill can cause it to feel much colder than the temperature suggests. Make sure children are dressed properly with hats, scarves, gloves, coats, and boots. 

 ·         Numbness, white or gray skin, and skin that feels unusually firm or waxy is a sign of frostbite.

·         Make sure children have proper winter clothing for school, including a hat and gloves.  They may spend a great deal of time waiting for the bus or playing outside for recess.

Winter Sports

 

  • Make sure your child wears the proper safety gear (helmets and gloves) for skiing and snowboarding.
  • If your child will be ice skating or playing hockey on a pond or lake, make sure an adult checks the thickness and condition of the ice.  Children should always be supervised on the ice and should never skate alone.